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Articles in "Wine"

Whether you are starting a new private label, trying to procure wine to meet demand or off loading excess inventory, understanding how to successfully buy and sell bulk wine is an essential part of any modern wine business.

Today's wine lovers are more informed than ever. They know what they like, they know where to get it, and how to serve it right. Restaurants have to work hard just to meet the high standards of their guests. By playing close attention to presentation, preservation, temperature, and quality of service, they can add value to the wine itself.

Leaders in the industry understand what a crucial role their wine by-the-glass program plays in building a loyal customer base. Ordering wine by-the-glass should be seamless, free of stress or intimidation, and should foster a sense of excitement.

Restaurateurs at the forefront of wine preservation technology can attest to the system’s financial merits. Wine savvy guests, who are more apt to try something new, know what to look for in a strong by-the-glass program.

[Editor's Note: Enjoy our four-part series on wine preservation systems, by-the-glass programs, and how it may impact your business.]

Not so long ago, Americans purchased Chile’s “fighting varietals” for everyday home consumption. But when it came to dining out, Chilean wines were thought of as déclassé—restaurant hosts wouldn’t think of listing them. Today, restaurant beverage managers stock the best wines from Chile because they know that for quality and value at all wine list price points, the current crop of Chilean wines are winners. Chile’s superpremium Cabernets and “super-Chilean” Bordeaux blends are world-class, the best of the whites are crisp and complex, and the country offers a splendid, one-of-a-kind wine—Carmenère. My, how times have changed.

Could it be time to consider the rebirth of the carafe?

As a restaurant group whose menu mix is predominantly seafood we often find ourselves encouraging diners to indulge their natural red wine preference, despite whatever myths they may have absorbed over the years about white wine being the exclusive appropriate selection for whatever swims.

Though there is some industry in the vicinity of its largest city, Bari, a countryside patched together with vineyards, olive groves, and fields of wheat testifies to Apulia’s most important products.

The latest Nebbiolo releases have arrived. Here’s an up close look at 2011 and 2012 Barolo, Barbaresco and Roero at historic and innovative wineries in the Alba area.

It is no secret that business is bubbling for Italy’s Prosecco producers. Total Prosecco sales here in the U.S. now easily surpass Champagne sales and are still growing at a 25% clip.  With a friendly, fruit-forward profile, lower alcohol content and moderate price tag, more and more customers are choosing to forego traditional Champagne and order Prosecco instead. It seems that Prosecco has carved out its own niche, a bubbly with a more informal, sprezzatura image, bucking the conventional notion of formality, celebration and splurge. In fact, along with a smaller, but undeniable Cava resurgence, Proseccos have boosted sparkling wine consumption in the U.S. by nearly 50% in less than a decade.

Too many wine buyers approach the buying process without a concrete plan in place. Buying decisions are often made on a whim, driven by supplier, score, or perhaps sommelier ego. To make the buying process more objective, I created a concept that I call “list mapping.”

To ensure heightened wine sales now and for years to come, it would be wise for hospitality professionals to create sales-building programs that cater to these extremely stable—and thirsty— consumers.

Monterey. The name evokes so many vivid Californian and American images . . . John Steinbeck and Cannery Row, a beautiful bay teeming with deep-sea fish and mammals, abalones, seaside golf, a picturesque Carmel artists’ colony, a rugged coastline of surf-torn rocks and steep mountains . . . and wine. Yes, Monterey County’s wines deserve acclaim on the order of every other magnificent Monterey attraction.

Food-friendly wines from Ribera del Duero offer broad ranges of styles and prices that most american restaurants can embrace, from value-priced, fruity, quaffable Joven/Roble bottlings to complex and age worthy Riservas and Gran Reservas.

Of Spain’s trio of celebrated red wine regions, La Rioja has a long international reputation for excellence. Priorat, which burst on the wine scene two decades ago, remains aglow with praise for its distinctive high-octane, mineral-laden wines. Ribera del Duero, like Priorat, is short on fine-wine history, but it doesn’t generate the same gush of print and online media attention. Smart American restaurant buyers, however, seek out and list Ribera wines.

Michael Mina's head sommelier, Josiah Baldivino shares two "Wow factor" reds.

Table 301's Beverage Director, Aimee Mahar tells us why Richard Betts' Saint Glinglin is approachable, sophisticated, and delicious.

Opening a bottle of bubbly can be a daunting experience for anyone but particularly for those with minimal experience. Practice makes perfect.

Chicago's Angela Aspito of the Signature Room on the 95th shares her picks with Santé.

Digital marketing agency, Groove, uses the basics of storytelling to engage wineries with their target audience.

St. Regis Atlanta's Jennifer Sollinger Shares her Favorite Bordeaux-style Blend with Sante. 

Sommeliers Liz Vilardi and Orla Murphy-LaScola share some satisfyingly delicious Sauvignon Blancs.