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Food

The Most-Read Food Stories of 2019

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 10, 2019 - 3:24pm
From articles on climate change to a review of a Brooklyn institution, the most popular stories this year were ones that prompted reader discussion.
Categories: Food

Top 10 New York Dishes of 2019

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 10, 2019 - 2:13pm
From pizza to pasteles, Pete Wells picks some highlights in a year of eating and drinking.
Categories: Food

Eating Globally: Hungry City’s Top 10 Restaurants of 2019

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 10, 2019 - 1:46pm
Our three critics found their favorites off the beaten path, in New York’s rich mix of the world’s cuisines.
Categories: Food

Baked Pastas Nodding to Florence Come to the West Village

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 10, 2019 - 1:18pm
A West Village spot from a Danny Meyer alumna, the return of Colors NYC and more restaurant news.
Categories: Food

New York’s Top 10 New Restaurants of 2019

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 10, 2019 - 11:38am
Pete Wells names his favorites among the new food halls, tasting counters, pasta joints, dim sum parlors and taco trucks he visited this year.
Categories: Food

New Look for Baked Goat Cheese

Planet Cheese - December 10, 2019 - 11:00am

Forty years ago next spring, Chez Panisse Café opened in Berkeley and introduced Americans to the baked goat cheese salad. The café’s menu changes daily, but that dish is still on it, a testament to its enduring popularity. As a cook there in the early days, I made a few million of those salads. I still love the combination of quivery cheese and crunchy breadcrumbs.

The Chez Panisse classic calls for serving the warm cheese on dressed baby greens. For a heartier variation that appeals to me in cold weather, I’ll place the soft cheeses on a warm red cabbage salad sharpened with sherry vinegar. You can cook the cabbage ahead; just undercook it slightly to allow for reheating.

For breadcrumbs, I like to use finely crushed croutons. I make my own from a sliced baguette, brushing the slices with olive oil on both sides and baking them in a 375°F oven until they are golden brown. When they’re cool, I pulverize some of them in a food processor and save some to serve with the salad. You can use store-bought packaged croutons or get them from a supermarket salad bar.

Baked Goat Cheese with Warm Red Cabbage Salad

Choose a rindless goat cheese log that you can slice into rounds with a thin knife. The slices should be at least an inch thick. If your goat cheese is more than a couple of inches in diameter, an inch-thick slice will be too much for one person. In that event, cut the slice in half to make half-moons. Adapted from The Cheese Course by Janet Fletcher (Chronicle Books).

  • 1/3 cup walnuts

  • 3-1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • 1/2 large red onion, thinly sliced

  • 1 large clove garlic, minced

  • 1/2 small head red cabbage (about 12 ounces), cored and very thinly sliced

  • Scant ½ teaspoon fennel seed, crushed in a mortar or spice grinder

  • 1-1/2 tablespoons sherry vinegar, or more to taste

  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 tablespoon chopped Italian parsley

  • Four 2-ounces portions fresh goat cheese with no rind

  • ½ cup fine crumbs made from homemade or storebought croutons

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Toast the walnuts on a baking sheet until fragrant and lightly colored, about 10 minutes. Let cool, then chop coarsely.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté until just wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute to release its fragrance. Add the cabbage, fennel seed, 1-1/2 tablespoons sherry vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste. Toss with tongs to blend. Cook briskly, tossing often, until the cabbage softens and is no longer crunchy, about 5 minutes. Taste and add a little more vinegar if desired. Add the walnuts and parsley. Let cool slightly.

Preheat the broiler and position a rack 7 to 8 inches from the heating element. Roll the cheese in the remaining 1-1/2 tablespoons olive oil, then in the crumbs, coating all sides evenly. (You may not need all the crumbs.) Place on a baking sheet and broil until the crumbs on top darken slightly and become crisp, about 1 minute. (Watch carefully to prevent scorching.) Reduce the oven temperature to 425°F and bake until the cheese feels quivery, about 4 minutes.

Divide the warm cabbage salad among 4 plates and top with the cheese. Serve immediately.

Serves 4

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Categories: Food

The Golden Crunch of Churros for Hanukkah

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 10, 2019 - 10:45am
Drawing inspiration from Jewish Latinos, some cooks and bakers are making the sweet fritters for the holiday, instead of the traditional jelly doughnuts.
Categories: Food

Writing, and Cooking, Across Borders

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 10, 2019 - 5:00am
In “Of Morsels and Marvels,” the Guadeloupean novelist Maryse Condé writes about the links between her culinary and literary passions.
Categories: Food

A New Turkey for the Season

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 10:01pm
D’Artagnan now sells a free-range turkey raised on scrap vegetables.
Categories: Food

Lady M Adds Champagne to Its Signature Creation

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 10:00pm
A seasonal Mille Crêpes cake is topped with a glittering gelée made with bubbly.
Categories: Food

Museum of Ice Cream Returns With a Bigger Space

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 10:00pm
The eye-catching experiential museum now has three stories of Instagram-able ice cream moments.
Categories: Food

Say ‘Seasons Greetings’ With Chocolate

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 9:59pm
Sweeter Cards offer a thoughtful card with a little something extra — a full-size chocolate bar.
Categories: Food

This Hanukkah, Let Michael Solomonov Make Dinner

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 4:23pm
For a Whole Foods holiday meal, the Zahav chef serves chicken schnitzel and other fried delights.
Categories: Food

Italian Cookies for the Holidays

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 1:47pm
Find 11 colorful sweets at the retail counter of a new Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, cafe, Ciao, Gloria.
Categories: Food

Fourth Floor, Men’s Wear. Fifth Floor, Martinis.

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 1:35pm
As Manhattan department stores add sleek cocktail bars, holiday shopping is beginning to look a lot like happy hour.
Categories: Food

The 10 Best Los Angeles Dishes of 2019

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 11:41am
As she finishes her first year as our California restaurant critic, Tejal Rao names the flavors she can’t forget from in and around the city.
Categories: Food

You’ll Never Buy Caramel Corn Again

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 9, 2019 - 10:30am
Melissa Clark’s new recipe is light, super-crisp, very caramel-y — in short, bonkers delicious.
Categories: Food

What to Cook This Week

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 8, 2019 - 10:30am
Pan-roasted chicken in cream sauce, Indian-spiced tomato and egg casserole, a swordfish piccata: Make foods to comfort against the cold.
Categories: Food

Call It a Crime of Pasta

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 7, 2019 - 5:00am
The famous pasta-making women of Bari, Italy, are worried that a crackdown on contraband orecchiette pasta could threaten their way of life.
Categories: Food

Denmark Raises Antibiotic-Free Pigs. Why Can’t the U.S.?

NYTimes Dining and Wine - December 6, 2019 - 4:09pm
American pigs are raised on a liberal diet of antibiotics, fueling the rise of resistant germs. Danish pork producers are proving there’s a better way.
Categories: Food